Who had the first Thanksgiving Canada or USA? - Thanks Giving day 2018

Friday, August 31, 2018

Who had the first Thanksgiving Canada or USA?

Who had the first Thanksgiving Canada or USA?4 Big Differences Between Canadian and American Thanksgiving
When you're sitting down for Turkey Day dinner, wow your relatives with factoids about a few of the differences between Canadian and American Thanksgiving.

1. Canada probably did it first.

There's a lot to be grateful for this Thanksgiving: friends and family, leftovers, a long weekend ... and don't forget Canada! English explorer Sir Martin Frobisher and his crew first got their thanks on in Newfoundland in 1578, which is widely accepted at the first celebration of Thanksgiving in North America (there is, however, some debate as to when the first Thanksgiving actually occurred, and where). The story goes that Frobisher and company hadn't found the Northwest Passage to the Orient like they'd been hoping to, but still wanted to celebrate a safe arrival in the New World.
The frequently cited first American Thanksgiving in Plymouth, Massachusetts, occurred some 43 years later in 1621. We don't need to tell you the American version is a bit more controversial. The Pilgrims gathered to celebrate God's bounty and a good harvest. The Native Americans who helped the Pilgrims survive—many of whom were killed or exploited, in turn—may or may not have been invited to the party.

2. Canada still celebrates it first.

Since 1957, Canadian Thanksgiving—which the natives simply call Thanksgiving—has occurred on the second Monday of October. But it hasn't always been that way. Years after the first celebration, the holiday occurred sporadically to coincide with larger events, differing by region. And if these events didn't occur in autumn? No big deal. In 1816, the end of the war between Great Britain and France inspired Thanksgiving in both Lower and Upper Canada in May and June, respectively. Then in 1921, the country tried to schedule a two-for-one so that Armistice Day and Thanksgiving would both be celebrated the Monday of the week of November 11. Thanksgiving's a lot less confusing now that Canada's one big tribe and can always count on the same annual three-day weekend.
Back in the U.S., Franklin D. Roosevelt is still regarded as one of the greatest presidents of the 20th century. He helped America recover from the Great Depression and fight a world war. He taught us that "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." But no one talks about how FDR ruffled everyone's turkey feathers in 1939. Another beloved president, one Abraham Lincoln, first declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863. The president was given the power to choose the date of the holiday each year, but the last Thursday of November became the standard. Holidays were difficult to celebrate during the Great Depression. Many businesses worried that most Americans wouldn't spend money Christmas shopping if Thanksgiving fell on the last day, or the fifth Thursday, of the month, as it did in 1939. So Roosevelt moved the holiday one week earlier, to the dismay of many Americans. Calendars were out-of-date. School schedules were disrupted. And retailers still complained that they were losing income. Some states decided to ignore the presidential decision and celebrate Thanksgiving on the usual day; others followed the president. For the next two years, Roosevelt made Thanksgiving the second to last Thursday of the month. But no one likes to fight over turkey dinner. In 1941, Congress officially declared Thanksgiving to be the fourth Thursday of November every year. Let them eat pie!

3. Holiday, Legislate!

Thanksgiving's a statutory holiday in most of Canada, meaning that it's celebrated nationally, but can also be legislated at the provincial and territorial levels. But in Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, Thanksgiving's optional. Most Canadians still get the day off, but others get paid overtime for working. One word of advice: Tell them thank you.
Thanksgiving's a federal holiday in the U.S., so most Americans get a day off to stuff themselves—and then a long weekend to reheat leftovers. Still, many others, from hospital employees to store clerks to restaurant workers, hold down the fort over the holiday. Another word of advice: Tell them thank you.

4. There's no Black Friday in the Great White North.

Historically, Canada's biggest shopping day of the year is Boxing Day, the day after Christmas. Imagine Black Friday, but with thousands of people returning disappointing gifts. There are sales and lines and yes, sometimes even a boxing match in the aisles. (Not everyone in Canada can be friendly.) While Black Friday has picked up in Canada, it isn't nearly the mess that it is in the United States.
Each year, American retailers sell massive amounts of inventory on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, and the much less ominous sounding Cyber Monday, the Monday after Thanksgiving. (The latter term was coined back in 2005. Can you believe it's only been seven years?) The two events are some of the biggest shopping days of the year. This year, the most crazy, err, dedicated shoppers are spending their vacation days camping out in front of stores up to a week before Black Friday. Hey, it's a free country.
Happy Thanksgiving!
In the United States, Thanksgiving is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November but in Canada, it is celebrated on the second Monday in October (which is Columbus Day in the U.S.). While Americans and Canadians both celebrate Thanksgiving Day, there are several differences between the traditions and practices in the two neighboring countries

Origins and Significance

Thanksgiving in Canada originated purely as a harvest festival. On January 31, 1957, the Canadian Parliament proclaimed:
A Day of General Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed – to be observed on the 2nd Monday in October.
English explorer Martin Frobisher hosted the first Canadian Thanksgiving. It was held in what is now Newfoundland during his expedition's attempts to find the Northwest Passage to the Orient in 1578 and marked their safe arrival to the New World. So it was not hosted to celebrate a bountiful harvest. With time, French, Scottish and German immigrants to Canada added some of their traditions to the harvest festival. American traditions like the turkey were added by the United Empire Loyalists around the time of the American Revolution.
The first American Thanksgiving was celebrated 43 years later in 1621 at the site of Plymouth Plantation, in Massachusetts. The Wampanoag Native Americans helped the pilgrims who arrived in Massachusetts cultivate the land and fish, saving them from starvation. At harvest time in the winter of 1621, they were very thankful that they had a good crop of food to eat during the coming winter. They thanked God and the Wampanoags for teaching them how to grow crops. The Thanksgiving holiday became a national phenomenon during the Civil War and a true national holiday during FDR's presidency. This article in the New York Times describes in detail the history of the Thanksgiving holiday and its various proponents, from Sara Hale to George Washington to Lincoln to Franklin Roosevelt.
Who had the first Thanksgiving Canada or USA?

Date of Thanksgiving

In the United States, Thanksgiving was observed on various dates but by the mid 20th century, most states celebrated on the last Thursday in November. On December 26, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill into law making Thanksgiving a national holiday and settling it to the 4th Thursday in November. The day after Thanksgiving is also a holiday so Thanksgiving is always a 4-day weekend for Americans.
Similarly in Canada, the festival did not have a fixed date until the late 19th century, at which time it was typically held on November 6. In 1957 the Canadian Parliament proclaimed Thanksgiving to be observed on the 2nd Monday of October. Thanksgiving is a 3-day weekend in Canada.

Differences in Traditions

There are many common Thanksgiving traditions in Canada and the United States.

Travel and family

In both countries Thanksgiving is a time to get together with family. In the U.S. the Thanksgiving holiday weekend is the busiest travel day of the year. Some Canadians use the 3-day holiday for a weekend getaway.

Thanksgiving meal

During the American Revolution, Americans loyal to Englandmoved to Canada and brought along Thanksgiving customs and practices. So there are many similarities in the Thanksgiving meals in both countries.
The featured item in a traditional Thanksgiving meal in America is turkey (Thanksgiving is sometimes called "Turkey Day"). The meal is usually a feast cooked for 5-10 people because families (and friends) often get together on this day. Stuffing, mashed potatoes with gravy, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce, sweet corn, other fall vegetables, and pumpkin pie are commonly associated with Thanksgiving dinner.
There are some differences between Canadian and American recipes for Thanksgiving. For example,
  • Canadian pumpkin pie is spicy, with ginger, nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon, while American pumpkin pie is typically sweet and has custard in it.
  • Canadians bake their sweet potatoes or mash them into a puree, while Americans add butter, sugar and spices to make a casserole topped with marshmallows.
  • Canadians use bread crumbs or rice for stuffing and in the U.S. stuffing is made with cornbread base in Southern states, oysters are used in the Eastern states and the Northern states use rice like Canadians.
  • Canadians traditionally serve wheat-based rolls of bread with Thanksgiving dinner, while Americans tend to serve corn bread rolls, muffins or sliced loaves.
The traditional Thanksgiving meal is dinner on Thursday in the U.S. whereas in Canada the feast could be held either on Sunday or Monday.

Shopping

In America the day after Thanksgiving is characterized by heavy shopping, encouraged by several enticing deals and discounts offered by retailers. Stores typically open early on Friday morning and people line up at night to be the first ones through the door when stores open so that they get the choicest "doorbuster" deals. The day is called "Black Friday" because traditionally that is the day when retail stores go from red to black (turn a profit) for the year. The Monday after Thanksgiving is called "Cyber Monday" because of the heavy online shopping people do on that day.

Parades and Football

Thanksgiving in the United States is characterized by large parades, the Macy's Paradebeing most well known. Parades in Canada are smaller and at a local level. The Kitchener-Waterloo Oktoberfest parade serves as Canada's only Thanksgiving Day parade and is broadcast nationwide. Canadians also enjoy football on Thanksgiving Day - the Canadian Football League holds a nationally televised doubleheader known as the "Thanksgiving Day Classic".








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Who had the first Thanksgiving Canada or USA?

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